How to Ask Why You Didn’t Get the Job | Tess Eby on Upjourney

Insights

How to Ask Why You Didn’t Get the Job | Tess Eby featured on Upjourney

Avenica

Tess Eby, Managing Director at Avenica, was featured among other career experts in an article by Upjourney on how to confidently ask for feedback on why you didn’t get the job.

For advice and examples of how to ask this question and turn it into a learning experience, read the full article HERE.

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Related Articles

Laying the Foundation for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.

Insights

Laying the Foundation for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Teron Buford

By: Teron Buford, VP Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Growing up as a Black male in inner-city Chicago, I experienced my fair share of hardships. One might think that, as opportunities presented themselves, things got easier. Not exactly. Laws of thermodynamics suggest that energy is never destroyed but is transferred from entity to entity. I think the same can be said about the struggles of people of color as they navigate the landscape of predominantly white educational and professional workspaces. The worry and anxiety shifted from my neighborhood to my classroom. From my classroom to my office. All along the way, the challenges never subsided; they morphed to fit my new landscapes.

I remember sitting in an English 101 course as we covered literature that focused on social injustice. This took place at a predominantly white college in St. Paul, Minnesota. We were reading a book in which the author purposely left behind her financial stability to explore what it might mean to live on minimum wage. From paycheck to paycheck. During one of our class discussions, a young woman raised her hand and matter-of-factly asked “why don’t people just save more of their money? If they just saved more money, they wouldn’t have to live like they do.” My blood boiled as my inner monologue argued with itself: “Wow! She clearly has no idea about the systems in place that impede financial mobility and financial security. Is it my job to educate her? Am I to be the spokesperson for a group of underserved, underrepresented, and clearly misunderstood people? If I raise my hand, am I going to find myself on an island, fighting a worthy but losing battle? What do I stand to gain if I speak up? What do I stand to lose if I don’t?” I gathered my thoughts, calmed my spirit, and raised my hand.

I remember sitting in a meeting with a former employer where we were looking for ways to bring greater access to a product. We discussed some of the feedback we’d received that claimed our processes were biased and skewed, our policies were rooted in oppression, and that we were effectively marginalizing an already over-marginalized population. We went around the table giving countless examples of our intentions and explaining why our operations needed to remain the same. Some scoffed at the notion that we were a part of the problem. They even pointed out ways in which we have provided the solution. After about 40 minutes of pacifying and justifying our perspectives, my inner monologue was at it again: “I mean, the feedback is making good points. How can so many people experience our product in the same negative way and be wholeheartedly wrong? I understand that our intentions are positive, but does that outweigh the actual impact? Ok, now this is high stakes. Speaking up could jeopardize my job. My income. My family’s finances. Is this my fight? Can someone else do it? Maybe I can send a softly worded email after the meeting? No. That won’t get it done.” I cleared my throat, collected my thoughts, tried to push aside the fear, and spoke my piece.

“Diversity” seems to be the new buzzword floating around the atmosphere. Organizations are scrambling to recruit new and diverse talent. Interestingly enough, I was on a call with a friend at a large organization the other day. He’d asked why most of his diverse employees were leaving the company after 2-3 years. He’d shared that they had solid compensation packages, fancy titles, and fulfilling job responsibilities. I asked about the company’s culture as it relates to equity and inclusion and, not to my surprise, he couldn’t speak to it fully. And that’s the issue: treating DEI as a numbers game will never pan out in the end. The environment matters. The culture of the company as it relates to belonging matters. And, if companies are ever going to get ahead of the curve, they’ll have to build environments that are intentionally conducive to respecting diversity, building equity, and living out inclusion.

For the longest time, we based the success of diversity initiatives on sheer numbers. “That company has XX% people of color and women, which means they’re doing well.” Today, we understand that the issue is a bit too complex for tally marks alone to tell the whole story. Diversity and inclusion, from my perspective, is cultivating an environment that is not only demographically representative of the greater population, but also encourages, empowers, and uplifts the voices of employees who have been historically under-represented, under-valued and, quite frankly, silenced. A commitment to living out these ideals should not only be reflected in a company’s mission, vision, and values, but should be genuinely felt across the company.

There is something to be said for companies that have paid more than just lip service to their commitment to diversity and inclusion. Creating positions, departments, and/or committees with the dedicated responsibilities of increasing diversity and inclusion within an organization is a step in the right direction. Each company, however, will have a different set of obstacles to overcome on their journeys towards creating diverse and inclusive environments and should look to their workforce to help them identify the gaps. At Avenica, for example, we’ve created a diversity board comprised of leaders from various departments who have united to create intentional company-wide learning opportunities. Each quarter has a theme around which topics will be introduced and each month has a dedicated learning goal. There’s a mix of readings, videos, interactive modules, and person-to-person conversations to help aid in the growth process. We will also be rolling out an anonymous feedback survey that will allow participants a safe space to provide input. Regardless of the approach, it cannot be stated enough that company-wide buy-in is integral in this process. Companies should intentionally work to ensure that all employees understand the value of a diverse and inclusive work environment.

All of this, of course, is easier said than done. The marathon of creating inclusive and welcoming spaces functions less as a one-person race and more like a relay; requiring a concerted effort from all involved. No one has all the answers. For more help with laying the foundation for DEI work, I’d recommend starting (but not stopping) with the resources below.

Stay strong.

 

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Related Articles

The Underemployment Trap: Why Your First Job Is Critical

Insights

The Underemployment Trap: Why Your First Job Is Critical

Avenica

LinkedIn

Employment rates in the U.S. have risen every year since the Great Recession of 2008–2009. And today unemployment is at near-historic lows. While that’s great news for many job seekers, hiding behind those gaudy numbers is a phenomenon that’s far less positive—one that impacts young job seekers most of all.

It’s underemployment.

Underemployment happens when someone is in a job for which they are overqualified—the typical situation is a bachelor’s graduate in a role that doesn’t require a degree. Consider the cliché of the Art History major working as a barista. Or a “foot-in-the-door” job, such as an IT grad working the help desk or a sports performance major folding towels at a health club. Underemployment also happens when someone would prefer to work full time but can only secure part-time employment.

First-job underemployment has lasting effects

Where you start has a big impact on where you end up. A 2018 study found that 43% of new college grads were underemployed in their first job—earning an average of $10,000 less than grads who find employment appropriate for their qualifications. And this wage gap compounds year after year, so workers who are underemployed at the start of their careers are more likely to remain that way, even decades later—stuck in a rut of lower-paying, lower-prestige jobs.

Underemployment obviously has negative consequences for individual workers, but there are big ripple effects as well. Underemployed workers will have less income overall, which means they may be less likely to pay off their student loans, buy a home, go on vacation, or go out to dinner—all of which impacts the health of the broader economy.

Underemployment seems to be growing

A certain amount of underemployment will always be with us. Some new grads take more time to find their career path. Others may choose careers that don’t fit their area of study. Still others may lack the motivation or interest in pursuing roles appropriate for their credentials.

Although researchers and experts differ on the exact numbers around underemployment, most agree that it’s growing. Why?

Multiple factors are at work. College enrollment has grown since 2000—which means more new graduates are pursuing a finite pool of jobs. Older generations of workers are holding onto their jobs longer, further reducing the number of higher-skill positions. The trend toward contract, gig, or part-time roles means many recent graduates find themselves with less than a full-time work. And the skills required for today’s jobs are more complex and changing rapidly, which means many graduates are leaving school without the abilities employers need.

Safeguarding your career against underemployment

The rise of underemployment is definitely cause for concern. But there are things you can do to protect yourself and your career. Here are just a few:

  • Select the right major. When it comes to underemployment, your field of study makes a big difference. The fields least likely to be underemployed include engineering, computer science, nursing, and education. The areas of highest underemployment? General liberal arts, performing arts, security and law enforcement, leisure and hospitality, and fitness. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York keeps fascinating stats on underemployment by major.
  • Get real about what employers need. Whatever your area of study, students or recent grads shouldn’t assume their degree will guarantee a job in their field. Do your research on specific jobs, salaries, skills, and employer needs in your profession of interest.
  • Seize opportunities to upskill. Employers still value the communication, analytical, and critical thinking skills that college graduates have. But hiring managers often look for specific, technical abilities as well. Building these “last mile” skills—whether through online tools, volunteering, or technical classes—can make all the difference.
  • Explore Avenica. We don’t like to toot our own horn, but preventing underemployment is kind of a big thing for us. Avenica specifically works with college graduates to help them identify their career goals, interests, and skills and then match them to opportunities that are the right fit.

Whether you’re still in college, mere months away from graduation, or already out in the working world, underemployment may be lurking. But there are steps you can take to keep it at bay. Educate yourself about this trend and you’ve taken a big step toward building a successful career for the long term.

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Related Articles

KARE11 interview with Scott Dettman on professional development during the pandemic

Insights

KARE11 interview with Scott Dettman on professional development during the pandemic

Avenica

Biography

Avenica CEO Scott Dettman joined Lauren Lemancyk on KARE11 to share advice for people seeking professional advancement during the time of COVID.

“Mentorship is another way to think about support and sponsorship,” Dettman said. “The people who persevere through difficult times are those who turn to their networks. For those just entering the workforce, mentors can help you navigate the first steps of finding a job. Mentors help you think outside the box. It gives you the chance to bounce ideas off another person and ask questions.”

Watch the full interview for more insights.

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Related Articles

Avenica CEO Scott Dettman Talks Job Search Strategies with CNN’s Lynn Smith

Insights

Avenica CEO Scott Dettman Talks Job Search Strategies with CNN’s Lynn Smith

Avenica

Biography

Avenica CEO Scott Dettman went #InstagramLive with Lynn Smith, CNN HLNTV anchor and host, to talk job search strategy, networking, and more during the pandemic.

Check out the full video HERE.

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Related Articles

Avenica CEO Scott Dettman authors article for Training Magazine

Insights

Avenica CEO Scott Dettman authors article for Training Magazine

Avenica

Biography

Avenica CEO Scott Dettman authored an article for Training Magazine advising employers on how to identify valuable skills that high-potential, entry-level candidates possess, rather than focusing on work experience and job-specific skills that can be taught and built into training.

“Identifying these valuable skills requires leaders to look beyond experience and the type of skills an employee could simply learn to do the job effectively. They must dig deep and rethink the questions they are asking to uncover these traits.”

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Related Articles

Dettman Interviewed for New Fortune Magazine Article

Avenica CEO Scott Dettman was featured in a Fortune Magazine article by McKenna Moore to discuss how the coronavirus pandemic will affect the hiring process for both job seekers and employers. While companies shift their focus onto new ways to work and remain relevant in the current environment, Dettman also expects to see changes in the way companies recruit and evaluate potential hires. Read the full story HERE.

If you’re a student nearing graduation, a recent grad, or an early professional looking to take full advantage of your degree, check out our Avenica Pathways career development program for behavioral assessments, personalized coaching, and other valuable insights.

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Related Articles

Avenica Honors Juneteenth as a Company Holiday

Insights

A Day to Celebrate: Avenica Honors Juneteenth as a Company Holiday

Avenica

Earlier this month, we announced steps we’re taking to create what we hope will be meaningful and impactful change to create safer, more equitable, and more inclusive workplaces and communities.

As we look around, we’ve been encouraged by so many other companies across the country commit to doing the same in their own ways. Because we know that it isn’t our actions alone that will solve or end systemic racism, it’s all of us, taking individual steps in the right direction, that will turn the tide and create positive change.

Today we’re proud to take another step as we announced that from this year forward, Avenica will recognize and celebrate Juneteenth as an annual, company-paid holiday.

“Our hope is that this helps bring awareness to the significance and importance of this day and gives us all time to reflect and further educate ourselves,” says Scott Dettman, CEO, Avenica.

For more information and history on the “oldest nationally-celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States,” please visit the Juneteenth website.

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Related Articles

Avenica’s Kayleigh Christenson on Creating the Perfect Resume

Insights

Avenica’s Kayleigh Christenson on Creating the Perfect Resume

Avenica

Biography

In a recent feature for MyPerfectResume, Avenica Senior Account Manager Kayleigh Christenson talks about the do’s and don’t when it comes to adding flair and creativity to your resume.

With a focus on the format of a resume, Kayleigh shares insights on what are absolute musts for a resume and others that you may want to skip, such as adding an address to the header of your resume.

For more details on how to craft the perfect resume that will help you stand out to hiring managers, read the full article HERE.

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Related Articles

Avenica CEO featured in Fortune Magazine

Avenica CEO Scott Dettman was featured in a Fortune Magazine article by McKenna Moore to discuss how the coronavirus pandemic will affect the hiring process for both job seekers and employers. While companies shift their focus onto new ways to work and remain relevant in the current environment, Dettman also expects to see changes in the way companies recruit and evaluate potential hires. Read the full story HERE.

If you’re a student nearing graduation, a recent grad, or an early professional looking to take full advantage of your degree, check out our Avenica Pathways career development program for behavioral assessments, personalized coaching, and other valuable insights.

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Related Articles

Our response to COVID-19.Learn More