Navigating the Application Process

When it comes to applying for jobs, the process can be overwhelming and tiresome. It can be discouraging and difficult to find the motivation to apply when you feel lost in your search. However, applying for jobs is a crucial step in the hiring process. It not only shows your interest in the position, but it informs the employer of your skills and experience. Knowing how to apply for jobs is a key factor that will help to improve your chances of receiving an invitation to interview. To help you successfully navigate the application process, try these tips:

  • Be Organized – It is important to be organized when it comes to applying for jobs. It is easy to forget what you have applied for and soon everything starts to blend together. One easy way to avoid this is by having a system to document your progress. Create an excel sheet listing the name of the company, job title, date you applied, or any other information that may be important for you to remember. If you prefer writing things down, use a notebook to help keep track of your progress. There are countless apps and platforms online to help your job tracking, too!
  • Research – Before applying to a position, make sure you have fully read the job description and taken a look at the company’s website. You want to ensure that the position you are applying for is something that you are not only a fit for, but interested in as well. Be curious -, research and have an interest inat the roles you are looking into!
  • Be Yourself – The application process is designed for the employer to get to know you better. It is important to be your true, authentic self when applying for jobs. Remember that the employer also wants you to do well and wants to see you for who you are as a person, not just an employee.

  • Tailor Your Application – Customizing your resume or cover letter for the position you are applying for is a great way to catch the attention of the hiring manager. Use keywords from the job description and desired skills listed. Adjusting the phrasing of these skills and accomplishments can help your application land on top.
  • Use Multiple Platforms – Explore online job boards, company websites, and professional networking platforms to find suitable job openings. You can also leverage your professional network by informing your friends, family, and colleagues about your job search. In addition, attend networking events or industry-related gatherings.Not only is self-care important, but so is setting boundaries for yourself. Work is only one aspect of your life – don’t let it overtake other parts! To create these boundaries, define what your specific work hours are and stick to those, even confirming your hours with your manager so that you are both in agreement with your expectations. We all know there are times when overtime is needed, but try not to let that become the norm if possible.

Remember to be persistent, patient, and adaptable throughout the job search process. Each application and interview is a learning opportunity that can contribute to your overall success. Good luck!

If you’re looking for information on how to kickstart your career, browse jobs today! We help entry-level and mid-level job seekers find positions that fit their expertise and career goals. Find more advice to help you in your job search.

The Dos and Don’ts of Interview Small Talk

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The Dos and Don’ts of Interview Small Talk

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Avenica

 

Small talk is a form of conversation that helps people establish rapport, build relationships, and create a comfortable atmosphere in various social or professional settings. Utilizing small talk in a job interview is a way to establish rapport before diving into the more formal aspects of the interview such as your interest, qualifications, and fit for a position, and allows an employer to see your personality and communication skills.

It’s a skill that can be developed with practice, and the more you engage in it, the more natural it will become. Here are some dos and don’ts for incorporating small talk into a job interview:

DO’S:

1. Do Be Friendly and Approachable: Start with a warm and friendly demeanor to create a positive atmosphere.

2. Do Research: Before the interview, research the company and the interviewer, if possible, to find common ground for small talk.

3. Do Show Genuine Interest: Actively listen to the interviewer and respond with genuine interest in their comments.

4. Do Use Good Body Language: Maintain good eye contact, smile, and use open and relaxed body language to convey attentiveness.

5. Do Keep It Professional: While being friendly, remember you’re in a professional setting. Keep the conversation appropriate and respectful.

6. Do Stay Positive: Keep the conversation upbeat. Avoid complaining or bringing up negative topics.

DON’TS:

1. Don’t Overshare: Avoid sharing overly personal information. Keep the conversation focused on professional and neutral topics.

2. Don’t Interrupt: Let the interviewer finish their thoughts before responding. Interrupting can be seen as rude.

3. Don’t Get Off Track: While small talk is a way to build rapport, don’t let it derail the interview schedule or focus.

4. Don’t Bring Up Controversial Topics: Avoid discussing sensitive or controversial topics such as politics, religion, or personal problems.

5. Don’t Dominate the Conversation: Remember that small talk should be balanced. Avoid  dominating the conversation or monopolizing the interviewer’s time.

6. Don’t Be Negative: Avoid negative comments about previous employers or colleagues, as this can reflect poorly on you.

In essence, small talk during an interview should be a tool to establish rapport and make a positive impression. It’s an opportunity to showcase your social skills and professionalism, so keep it light, positive, and relevant to the professional context.

If you’re looking for information on how to kickstart your career, browse jobs today! We help entry-level and mid-level job seekers find positions that fit their expertise and career goals. Find more advice to help you in your job search.

The Power of Feedback

Job searching can feel like a full-time job. It involves consistent dedication searching for roles, applying, interviewing, and overcoming rejection. Rejection is something many people encounter throughout their job search, but there’s one thing job seekers can do to help improve their chances of finding that perfect role.

That one thing is asking for feedback! Asking for feedback during or after an interview can be daunting. It can make us feel inadequate or like we performed poorly in the interview. However, the truth is that asking for feedback can help us in multiple ways. Feedback could be related to anything from specific interviewing skills (i.e. how you answered each question) to how you conducted yourself in the interview; it could even be feedback that helps identify your interests for future interviews.

Below are important reasons as to why asking for feedback is critical and how it can aid your job search:

1. It shows your willingness to learn and a growth mindset.

This is an important skill for a potential new employee to have as it shows that you are seeking to improve. It also demonstrates your ability to accept constructive criticism, another important trait employers seek in potential employees.

2. It demonstrates a commitment to self-improvement.

By receiving feedback from a professional you can identify areas where you struggle in interviews. This will allow you to work on specific areas for development, thus helping you might be considered for a similar one or one you might be better suited for in the future.

3. It creates potential new opportunities.

When you ask for feedback, you are making a positive impression on the interviewer. This can be beneficial; if you are not considered for the applied role, you might be considered for a similar one or one you might be better suited for in the future.

4. It clarifies ability and position in the process for the role.

Asking for feedback lets you see where you stand in the process. It also helps you understand the reasons for potentially not being considered. This could have been something like the role not aligning with your desired hours or something on the employer’s side. All this helps you feel better by having a conclusive answer as to why you may or may not have been selected for the role.

5. It helps reveal your interests.

When people apply for jobs, they apply to anything and everything that they could be capable of doing based on their skills and experience. However, just because you can do it doesn’t mean you want to do it. Job searching consumes your focus and limits your ability to think about what is right for you. Asking for feedback in an interview can allow the interviewer to point out the roles you may be better suited for based on interests you may have overlooked.

6. It establishes rapport and a relationship with the interviewer.

Job searching is difficult to do alone. By asking for feedback, you establish more rapport with the interviewer and could even build a professional relationship with them. This, in turn, gives you access to their network, which could lead to the opportunity you have been looking for. Utilizing connections and networks can go a long way and could lead you to find your perfect role.

All in all, asking for feedback may be intimidating, but it is something that can help you immensely in your job search and in your professional journey! It not only helps you improve your skills but also assists you in learning more about yourself than you would have without seeking feedback!

 

If you’re looking for information on how to kickstart your career, browse jobs today! We help entry-level and mid-level job seekers find positions that fit their expertise and career goals. Find more advice to help you in your job search.

Managing Job Stress: Tips for Self Care and Staying Motivated

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Managing Job Stress: Tips for Self Care and Staying Motivated

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Avenica

At some point in our career, most of us feel the stress of our job. Maybe it’s from a fast-approaching project deadline, a manager who sets unattainable expectations, or simply just too much on your plate.

Job stress can take many forms. Some of us may feel exhausted after the workday – even after 3 cups of coffee. Others may feel anxious, have constant thoughts of work outside of office hours, or even lose sleep over this stress. While these job stressors can impact our overall well-being, the good news is that there are many ways to overcome the mental and physical tolls that job stress can bring.

Self-care is a great way to combat the work woes. Because it allows you to put yourself and your needs above pressures and stresses, self-care is a key to preventing burnout. Here are some examples of what self-care could look like for you:

  • Treat yourself to Starbucks or your favorite local coffee shop on the way to work.
  • Take a 5-minute stretch break away from your desk.
  • Keep water and healthy snacks nearby to maintain energy levels throughout your day.
  • Practice deep breathing exercises before a stressful call or task.
  • Build relationships with your colleagues and talk about some non-work-related topics to build positive relationships in the workspace, even invite someone to grab lunch with you!
  • Take a walk on your break and get some fresh air.

Not only is self-care important, but so is setting boundaries for yourself. Work is only one aspect of your life – don’t let it overtake other parts! To create these boundaries, define what your specific work hours are and stick to those, even confirming your hours with your manager so that you are both in agreement with your expectations. We all know there are times when overtime is needed, but try not to let that become the norm if possible.

To get your work done in those given hours, prioritize your tasks. This could be done with a pen and paper or by utilizing software like Microsoft OneNote if you prefer it to be digital. Prioritizing tasks is helpful but so is setting up a work regimen. Develop a routine that helps you know what to expect each day. If you set aside the same time for certain tasks or meetings each day, then your brain will know what to expect. We are creatures of habit, so find a routine that works for you and your role.

Navigating the demands of a job while maintaining well-being can be a challenge, though not impossible! Prioritizing self-care, establishing clear boundaries, and implementing effective strategies can be helpful in your journey to minimizing job stress. These tips can help find your way to a fulfilling career without invading your personal life.

If you’re looking for information on how to kickstart your career, browse jobs today! We help entry-level and mid-level job seekers find positions that fit their expertise and career goals. Find more advice to help you in your job search.

Professional Communication Tips

At Avenica, we are passionate about our candidates’ professional development. A key part of professional development is your communication within the professional world. When starting a new role, communication begins with your application materials (resume and cover letter). It then progresses into your interview and follow-up communication. It doesn’t end when you land the job though; your professional communication style will stay with you throughout your entire career! We are going to share some tips, from our hiring experts, to make a positive impact on your career communication.

First things first, your tone. There is a time and place for casual loose conversations—writing an email to a hiring manager is not one of them. You are representing yourself and your professional abilities when communicating with hiring managers, which requires a level of professionalism that might not be standard in your day-to-day life. You might typically say “LOL” when forwarding an email to your friend, but this is definitely not something to send over to your potential boss! That being said, injecting your own unique personality can help you establish a genuine connection with your audience. Remember, being professional doesn’t mean being robotic or devoid of personality. It means presenting yourself in a respectful manner while still allowing your individuality to shine through.

Next to consider within your professional communication style, is your salutation and closing. It’s crucial to make a strong and concise first impression, and this is a great way to do so. In the salutation, begin with a formal greeting, such as “Dear [Recipient’s Name].” It’s important to be respectful, polite, and avoid using overly casual language when communicating with a potential professional connection. In the conclusion of the email, express gratitude, offer follow-up if necessary, and provide appropriate contact information. Use a closing, such as “Best regards” or “Sincerely,” followed by your name, title, and any relevant details. By maintaining a professional tone throughout the email and ensuring a thoughtful introduction and conclusion, you show your ability to communicate effectively and leave a positive professional impression on your recipients. By doing this, you’re demonstrating your capabilities to communicate well if you land the role.

In addition to emails, there is email’s trendy hip sister: texting. Texting allows for a more relaxed and informal communication style, but it’s important to remember that the context still calls for a level of professionalism. Keep your language clear, concise, and respectful, using proper grammar and punctuation to convey your message effectively. While you can incorporate a touch of informality, such as using contractions or emojis sparingly, it’s crucial to remain mindful of the appropriateness of the conversation and ensure that your tone aligns with the level of formality expected in your professional relationship. Ultimately, if it’s not a text you’d feel good about your future boss reading, you probably shouldn’t be hitting that send button.

To wrap up our professional communication tips, let’s dive into communication accountability. Communication accountability is crucial in the professional world, as it reflects one’s reliability and respect for others’ time. When it comes to accepting email invites, it’s essential to respond promptly, acknowledging the invitation and confirming your attendance or explaining that you cannot attend. If you cannot attend, respond clearly whether you would like to reschedule or not. This not only shows your professionalism but also helps the organizer make necessary arrangements. Additionally, sending a thank-you message after your interview demonstrates appreciation and is a great way to show your interest in the role. Keep your message specific and sincere, highlighting that you are grateful for their time and your continued interest in the role.

By being proactive, respectful, and considerate in your communication, you demonstrate accountability. In addition, you’ll foster positive professional relationships which are built on trust and reliability. These are traits that hiring managers are looking for in potential candidates!

If you’re looking for information on how to kickstart your career, browse jobs today! We help entry-level and mid-level job seekers find positions that fit their expertise and career goals. Find more advice to help you in your job search.

Breaking Down Core Values

What is a core value?

Core values represent a company’s deeply held beliefs. At Avenica, we say our core values are what drive our actions whether people are watching or not. They are impossible to fake and “core” to how individuals show up every day. If done correctly, core values can be the connecting force of teammates within a company.

Who comes up with core values? What does that process look like?

At Avenica, we implemented EOS (the Entrepreneurial Operating System®), to get better at defining our vision, to build a strong team, and instill clear focus and accountability. Understanding, communicating, and operating with core values is paramount to being a successful EOS company. Our EOS Implementor led us through an exercise that included listing out the qualities of strong performers and valued individuals within the organization. We narrowed in on commonalities to arrive at our list of core values. We revisit our core values quarterly to see if those values and our definition of those values still apply as the company matures.

How do core values play out in a company at a high level? What about day-to-day?

Core values should be at the heart of how a company operates day in and day out. They should be called out in meetings, listed as teammates are recognized for contributions, referenced when key decisions are being made, and “core” to the hiring, evaluating, and firing processes within a company.

Why do they matter when I am looking for a job?

Finding an authentic fit is important for an individual to be able to show up as their true self every day. We are paid to go to work for a reason. Work requires effort. Trying to be someone you’re not (but a company expects you to be) will require a great deal of time and energy. For many people, that takes more time and energy than simply doing their day job. A core values match allows an individual to focus on the work itself and drive results, instead of spending time and energy on “trying to fit in”.

How can I find a company that fits me?

When interviewing, ask questions about a company’s core values. Seek to understand what the values mean and if they speak to who you are and an environment you think will bring out the best in you. Also try to gauge how important the core values are within an organization. It’s telling if the interviewer needs to look up what the core values are, or if they speak freely about them. Ask the interviewer questions such as:

  • How are your core values demonstrated in day-to-day operations?
  • How are you evaluating me on whether I’m a core values fit?
  • How are your core values celebrated?
  • What happens when someone is deemed to not be a core values fit?

3 Ways to Support your Asian Colleagues

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3 Ways to Support your Asian Colleagues

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Nicole Peterlin

Director of Human Resources

In recognition of Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month, Avenica has been looking inward and investigating ways we can continue to support our AAPI colleagues. While AAPI is a nifty acronym that’s inclusive of most Asian and Asian American identities, it does little to fully recognize the vast richness of the AAPI communities, which consist of around 50 ethnic groups, speaking over 100 languages! Given the expansiveness of AAPI identities, how can employers and coworkers help support AAPI folks in the workplace? Here’s a good place to start:

1. Refute the Model Minority Myth

AAPI folks can often be labeled as the “model minority,” which leads to false assumptions that AAPIs have triumphed over discrimination and are much more successful than other marginalized groups. This stereotype, and the individual stories retelling AAPI success, obscure the ongoing struggle for equality and equity in the workplace that many AAPIs still face today.

2. Create strong cultures of inclusion and belonging

In a recent Bain & Company study, feelings of inclusion in the workplace were dismally low, but ranked lowest among Asian women and men. It’s important that people leaders and individual contributor employees help make people feel welcome in physical and virtual spaces where work is done. Inclusion work includes minimizing microaggressions and the use of stereotypes and recognizing the inherent value of individual differences, especially within the AAPI community.

3. Include AAPI in DE&I

Too often, formal DE&I programs focus on Black and Latino communities, excluding other marginalized groups such as AAPIs. Ensuring there’s space for AAPIs in DE&I efforts and programming combats stereotypes, offers reasons for AAPIs to share their stories and experiences, and promotes greater representation of AAPIs in the workplace.

How To Find Entry Level Remote Jobs

Working from home is more popular than ever, but you may wonder if there are entry-level remote jobs out there to help jump-start, or re-start, your career.

Recent events, like the pandemic, as well as improvements in remote technology have opened up more entry-level remote jobs than ever before. Finding the right entry-level position can be daunting, whether it’s your entrance into the workforce or you’re making a career change. However, finding a remote entry-level job can open up additional opportunities to find the right position for you.

Is remote work right for you?

Before you start searching for entry-level remote jobs, think carefully about what makes remote work different from local, in-office jobs. As a remote worker, you’ll work more independently. You’ll still be able to team up with co-workers, experience corporate culture and enjoy socialization, but it is different from working with others on a daily basis. If these elements of work are important to you (looking at you, extrovert!) make sure to ask prospective employers how they provide opportunities for team building for remote workers.

Other things to consider are your ability to manage your own time and priorities as a remote worker. Without the oversight of an in-person manager, you’ll be in charge of your workload and responsibilities. When looking for online jobs, think about your past experiences completing projects or assignments according to your own timeline. Once you’ve decided a remote job is the right fit for you, it’s time to prepare for the search.

Refresh your resume and online profiles

Before you start submitting applications, get your online presence in order.

Since your first impression will likely be a review of your resume, make sure you put your best foot forward. Leverage best practices, be sure to include all your professional experiences, and make sure to highlight your transferable skills–those skills that might not apply specifically to your new career track, but will help you perform the duties of your new job. Be sure to highlight the skills that will be necessary to be a great remote employee: self-starter, organized, dependable and good at time-management.

Remember that when applying for entry-level remote jobs, your online presence will be more important than ever. Start by Googling yourself and look at your results through the eyes of a potential hiring manager. If your Instagram account is flooded with party pics, consider making it private. In addition to damage control, polish up the profiles with professional influence, like LinkedIn. Complete your profile, update your experience and ask for recommendations from peers and past managers.

Depending on the type of work you are looking for, consider building a personal website or portfolio. This is a space that can reflect your personality, highlight projects and work you are proud of, and allow potential employers to get to know you better.

Search for entry-level remote jobs

One of the benefits of looking for entry-level remote jobs online is that you can search nationally, instead of just in your local area. This means you have more options, and it may also mean you can choose to live in an area with a lower cost of living while working for a company in a city that might be otherwise out of reach.

Use filters on job sites to search for jobs that are open to remote workers within your field. Some of the more popular positions for remote work include copywriter, marketing manager, financial analyst, loan officer, website developer and software engineer, to name a few. Entry level jobs can be great for learning what you really want from your career in the long run, so cast the net wide when it comes to your job search.

In addition to hunting on job sites, look for opportunities to network. Many networking events have gone online, so you can connect with people from all over the country, or the world, by attending events that relate to your career interests. Meet people on LinkedIn by commenting on their posts and engaging with them, and if you feel a connection, ask for an informational interview. Remember, once you open up your search to remote work, you can expand your network nationally, for more opportunities.

The prospect of remote work can offer more options to get in on the ground floor, get the experience you need to grow in your career, and find a job that satisfies you. Happy hunting!

About Avenica

If you’re looking for information on how to kickstart your career, browse our current job openings ! We help entry-level job seekers find positions that fit their expertise and career goals every day. To learn more about us, visit our About Us page.

How to Find A Work-From-Home Job That Requires No Experience

Working from home is more popular than ever, but you may wonder if there are entry-level remote jobs out there to help jump-start, or re-start, your career.

Recent events, like the pandemic, as well as improvements in remote technology have opened up more entry-level remote jobs than ever before. Finding the right entry-level position can be daunting, whether it’s your entrance into the workforce or you’re making a career change. However, finding a remote entry-level job can open up additional opportunities to find the right position for you.

Is remote work right for you?

Before you start searching for entry-level remote jobs, think carefully about what makes remote work different from local, in-office jobs. As a remote worker, you’ll work more independently. You’ll still be able to team up with co-workers, experience corporate culture and enjoy socialization, but it is different from working with others on a daily basis. If these elements of work are important to you (looking at you, extrovert!) make sure to ask prospective employers how they provide opportunities for team building for remote workers.

Other things to consider are your ability to manage your own time and priorities as a remote worker. Without the oversight of an in-person manager, you’ll be in charge of your workload and responsibilities. When looking for online jobs, think about your past experiences completing projects or assignments according to your own timeline. Once you’ve decided a remote job is the right fit for you, it’s time to prepare for the search.

Refresh your resume and online profiles

Before you start submitting applications, get your online presence in order.

Since your first impression will likely be a review of your resume, make sure you put your best foot forward. Leverage best practices, be sure to include all your professional experiences, and make sure to highlight your transferable skills–those skills that might not apply specifically to your new career track, but will help you perform the duties of your new job. Be sure to highlight the skills that will be necessary to be a great remote employee: self-starter, organized, dependable and good at time-management.

Remember that when applying for entry-level remote jobs, your online presence will be more important than ever. Start by Googling yourself and look at your results through the eyes of a potential hiring manager. If your Instagram account is flooded with party pics, consider making it private. In addition to damage control, polish up the profiles with professional influence, like LinkedIn. Complete your profile, update your experience and ask for recommendations from peers and past managers.

Depending on the type of work you are looking for, consider building a personal website or portfolio. This is a space that can reflect your personality, highlight projects and work you are proud of, and allow potential employers to get to know you better.

Search for entry-level remote jobs

One of the benefits of looking for entry-level remote jobs online is that you can search nationally, instead of just in your local area. This means you have more options, and it may also mean you can choose to live in an area with a lower cost of living while working for a company in a city that might be otherwise out of reach.

Use filters on job sites to search for jobs that are open to remote workers within your field. Some of the more popular positions for remote work include copywriter, marketing manager, financial analyst, loan officer, website developer and software engineer, to name a few. Entry level jobs can be great for learning what you really want from your career in the long run, so cast the net wide when it comes to your job search.

In addition to hunting on job sites, look for opportunities to network. Many networking events have gone online, so you can connect with people from all over the country, or the world, by attending events that relate to your career interests. Meet people on LinkedIn by commenting on their posts and engaging with them, and if you feel a connection, ask for an informational interview. Remember, once you open up your search to remote work, you can expand your network nationally, for more opportunities.

The prospect of remote work can offer more options to get in on the ground floor, get the experience you need to grow in your career, and find a job that satisfies you. Happy hunting!

About Avenica

If you’re looking for information on how to kickstart your career, browse our current job openings ! We help entry-level job seekers find positions that fit their expertise and career goals every day. To learn more about us, visit our About Us page.

5 Ways to Support Black Employees

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How To Find Entry-Level Remote Jobs

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Teron Buford

Working from home is more popular than ever, but you may wonder if there are entry-level remote jobs out there to help jump-start, or re-start, your career.

Recent events, like the pandemic, as well as improvements in remote technology have opened up more entry-level remote jobs than ever before. Finding the right entry-level position can be daunting, whether it’s your entrance into the workforce or you’re making a career change. However, finding a remote entry-level job can open up additional opportunities to find the right position for you.

Is remote work right for you?

Before you start searching for entry-level remote jobs, think carefully about what makes remote work different from local, in-office jobs. As a remote worker, you’ll work more independently. You’ll still be able to team up with co-workers, experience corporate culture and enjoy socialization, but it is different from working with others on a daily basis. If these elements of work are important to you (looking at you, extrovert!) make sure to ask prospective employers how they provide opportunities for team building for remote workers.

Other things to consider are your ability to manage your own time and priorities as a remote worker. Without the oversight of an in-person manager, you’ll be in charge of your workload and responsibilities. When looking for online jobs, think about your past experiences completing projects or assignments according to your own timeline. Once you’ve decided a remote job is the right fit for you, it’s time to prepare for the search.

Refresh your resume and online profiles

Before you start submitting applications, get your online presence in order.

Since your first impression will likely be a review of your resume, make sure you put your best foot forward. Leverage best practices, be sure to include all your professional experiences, and make sure to highlight your transferable skills–those skills that might not apply specifically to your new career track, but will help you perform the duties of your new job. Be sure to highlight the skills that will be necessary to be a great remote employee: self-starter, organized, dependable and good at time-management.

Remember that when applying for entry-level remote jobs, your online presence will be more important than ever. Start by Googling yourself and look at your results through the eyes of a potential hiring manager. If your Instagram account is flooded with party pics, consider making it private. In addition to damage control, polish up the profiles with professional influence, like LinkedIn. Complete your profile, update your experience and ask for recommendations from peers and past managers.

Depending on the type of work you are looking for, consider building a personal website or portfolio. This is a space that can reflect your personality, highlight projects and work you are proud of, and allow potential employers to get to know you better.

Search for entry-level remote jobs

One of the benefits of looking for entry-level remote jobs online is that you can search nationally, instead of just in your local area. This means you have more options, and it may also mean you can choose to live in an area with a lower cost of living while working for a company in a city that might be otherwise out of reach.

Use filters on job sites to search for jobs that are open to remote workers within your field. Some of the more popular positions for remote work include copywriter, marketing manager, financial analyst, loan officer, website developer and software engineer, to name a few. Entry level jobs can be great for learning what you really want from your career in the long run, so cast the net wide when it comes to your job search.

In addition to hunting on job sites, look for opportunities to network. Many networking events have gone online, so you can connect with people from all over the country, or the world, by attending events that relate to your career interests. Meet people on LinkedIn by commenting on their posts and engaging with them, and if you feel a connection, ask for an informational interview. Remember, once you open up your search to remote work, you can expand your network nationally, for more opportunities.

The prospect of remote work can offer more options to get in on the ground floor, get the experience you need to grow in your career, and find a job that satisfies you. Happy hunting!

About Avenica

If you’re looking for information on how to kickstart your career, browse our current job openings ! We help entry-level job seekers find positions that fit their expertise and career goals every day. To learn more about us, visit our About Us page.