Flexible Work Options 101

What are some ways to have flexibility at work?

Time off

FTO (Flexible time off) is a way that employers give their employees flexibility in the workplace. The FTO model offers employees as much or as little paid time off as they’re interested in. This time usually replaces traditional PTO balances or other paid days such as vacation days, sick days, emergency days, and other time off. Most often this involves coordination with a manager or team, to make sure all work is completed, and that coverage is available, but overall gives employees more freedom to manage their time away from work.

Flexible Working Hours

In 2020 the work model shifted; many traditionally in-office employees began working from home due to the COVID-19 pandemic. With so much work being done in the comfort of homes many people began asking, “is there really a reason work must be done between 8-5?” The answer is, “not always.” Many employees enjoy the benefit of working their own hours, which are commonly known as “flex time.” The traditional 8am -5pm work hour model can be shifted based on an employee’s personal needs and their employer’s expectations.

Time zones, in the past, have been a challenge in collaboration for corporations that operate nationwide. Now, however, employees can work remotely at a company that is based in a completely different time zone. Many employees are starting their days early and getting off early or starting later and finishing later. The expectation to be online between the hours of 8am – 5pm is fading for many companies and employees are taking in the freedom that this offers.

Riley Ovall is the Content Specialist for Avenica. She shared, “I work remotely for Avenica even though I live in a time zone five hours behind my team. I reached out to my supervisor prior to my move and asked if this is something the company would be able to support and got approval to work in a new state. I start my day at 5am and end my day at 2pm. I can attend all my meetings and complete work in this time, and then have the rest of my day to spend as I choose. I feel most productive in the mornings and have been seeing a huge push in my work since shifting to the hours that make me feel best, while living in a location I love!”

Compressed Work Week

The compressed work week has been a popular topic as some companies explore a four-day work week. A compressed work week looks like shifting a 40-hour five-day work week into a different number of days. It could look like four 10-hour days, 80-hours in nine days, or an agreed upon ratio between employer and employee. Employers are utilizing this to offer more full days off to employees, while maintaining the same amount of work. This could give flexibility to parents to volunteer for their children’s activities or allow for hobbies and opportunities that occur within traditional workdays.

Location

As more and more employees find themselves permanently in remote positions, the world opens to them. No longer does a person have to live in the same area as their employer. This freedom is commonly known as “flex place” and allows a person to work wherever they want. Not all companies have this ability, but it can be a huge plus to those looking for a big move, while maintaining a role they love.

“Being able to move was a super attractive part of my current role,” said Ovall. “I was hired while living at my parents’ post-graduation and knew eventually I would want to move out. Being able to spend 6 months saving up and establishing myself before moving out was a huge benefit. Now I am living in a place I love hundreds of miles away from where I was originally hired.”

Why are employers offering more flexible work benefits?

Employers are offering more flexible work benefits for many reasons. One reason is to give their employees the lifestyle that fits them best. By giving an employee the hours and location of their choice, they are entrusting their team members to take full ownership of their time and work. This trust often produces better results. Another reason for employers to explore this flexibility is to attract talent who are seeking a more flexible lifestyle. Offering flexible options can be a huge factor when an employee accepts an offer.

How can I find out how much flexibility a job offers?

Many employers will put flexible work opportunities in their job descriptions. A person can look in the benefits section of a job description to see if these options exist in the role they are applying for. This is also something that a hiring manager could explain during the interview process. In addition, it may be negotiable after being offered a position as a part of employee compensation.

What are some ways to make the most out of my flexible work options?

If someone gets the opportunity to enjoy flexible work benefits, there are many ways to utilize them. A person may choose to use flexible hours to explore their hobbies such as working out, being creative, or learning a new skill to advance their career. For many working parents, this can also mean more time spent chaperoning field trips or having flexibility when childcare falls through. Someone could also take time to volunteer with an organization they are passionate about. There is also opportunity to focus on a person’s mental health and recharge with flexible work hours.

If you’re looking for information on how to kickstart your career, contact Avenica or browse jobs today! We help our entry-level job seekers find positions that fit their expertise and career goals.

5 Ways to Support Black Employees

Insights

5 Ways to Support Black Employees

VP of DEI, Teron Buford shares five ways companies can support their Black employees.

Teron Buford

How can company’s support their employees directly and acknowledge issues they face?

First, and foremost, you must be bold. Often, companies feel the obligation to explain why they’re spending time, energy, efforts, and resources supporting a specific group (in this case, Black employees) to employees who are not members that group (in this case, White employees). It’s taxing and further alienates when the primary goal is to bolster feelings of belonging. Now, I’m not saying that companies shouldn’t provide background information on why initiatives exist; instead, I’m saying that companies should provide the background and move into the implementation stages ASAP. Don’t spend time worrying about which privileged/highly represented group members might have FOMO; spend that energy doing the work.

Get away from the idea that equality is the gold standard. It’s not. Equality suggests that giving everyone the same resources or treating everyone the same way is the fix-all for DEI issues within a company. That’s analogous to giving everyone a slice of pepperoni pizza and disregarding the fact that some folks can’t eat cheese, gluten, pork, and/or tomatoes. Be bold in listening to the needs of under-represented employee groups and then act on their feedback. That’s when we step away from the idea of equality and toward the aspiration of equity: meeting employees where they are and giving the access to resources to get them to where they want to be.

How should company’s reach out to their Black employees?

There’s no one-size-fits-all playbook for reaching out to black employees. The size of the company, number of Black employees, and already-established culture of the company are just a few things to consider when determining the best way to solicit input. Small company? Maybe safely assembling a group of Black employees to talk about their shared interests/concerns and potential solutions/desired outcomes is the way to go. Large company? Perhaps a climate survey to gauge perceptions and possible action steps. Knowing the audience and the company culture will be step one in devising an approach. Here’s the dirty little secret: it’s going to take time, trust-building, and intentionality to gain buy-in; that’s the hard part. But hard doesn’t mean “impossible.” We prioritize the things that we feel are important. If gaining perspective from your Black employees is valued, you’ll make time for it.

How should companies go about training for these topics?

Authentic voices are key. I want someone who looks and lives like me talking about experiences that are unique to people who look and live like me. That’s #1.

Modality is totally based on the audience. Some folks prefer reading and reflecting. Some prefer watching and taking notes. Others prefer listening and discussing. A healthy mix is probably the best way to go but, as always, the onus is with the facilitator(s) to know the group, understand their needs, and provide a curriculum that fits the learning style of the group. Remember: equity is better than equality in these cases.

It’s also important to note that modality should be fluid. What works today may not be applicable tomorrow. Instead of growing frustrated with changing landscapes, companies should work to become more flexible and open to the ever-evolving nature that is the human experience, which is exponentially more complicated at its intersection with race and ethnicity.

How can companies build a better workplace for Black employees?

Companies can’t be afraid to boldly go where others haven’t gone before. There will always be detractors and people who will ask “why do they get….but we don’t…..?” The company must determine which side of the fence they want to operate on and then do so boldly. Might you lose clients? Sure. Might you gain clients? Sure. It’s on the company to decide who and how it wants to serve. Part of that means listening to the needs of their under-represented employees (in this case, black employees) and then having the gumption to do something with the information that’s collected.

Also, building a diverse workforce is important but should not be the final goal. Companies need to ask themselves “what are we doing to empower the voices within our walls? Do we have meaningfully diverse and inclusive representation in positions of leadership? Do those in positions of leadership have power to create meaningful change?” You get the drift. It’s not a numbers game; it’s a matter of creating a sense of belonging and buy-in.

Also, if companies want to see more Black employees gravitate toward their business (for employment or use of services), companies should consider how they’re showing up to and for the Black community. Are you supporting policies and practices that benefit these communities? Are you speaking out against injustice? Are you using your platform to promote meaningful change? Are you modeling the environment you encourage other companies to have? Are you reinvesting in the community? Answering these (and other) questions will help you better understand how/why your company is/is not having success with recruiting, hiring, retaining Black talent and might provide insight on how the community views your presence.

How can leaders promote conversations around race?

They shouldn’t only “promote” the conversations; they should MODEL them. Be the example. Show that it’s ok to not know EVERYTHING. It’s ok to make mistakes, it’s ok to not fully grasp the lived-experiences and perceptions of other races. And, in the same vein, be willing to learn, share, own missteps, and take an active role in their own growth.

Leaders need to be better at acting on intel. If my son brings an important issue to me, it’s up to me to decide how to act on it. My response (or lack thereof) will directly impact his willingness to bring other concerns to me. His trust is me may falter. And his belief in my allyship may waiver. My son’s experience with me will undoubtedly be shared with my daughter who, too, may become wary of my desire to help. And, before I know it, the kids will be ready to label me as someone who is too rigid to change and too stubborn to admit shortcomings. Leaders need to allow themselves to believe the perspectives of others and then meaningfully work to support.

Leaders need to make working toward DEI+B (belonging) a priority. Not having “enough time” isn’t a good excuse. Not having “enough resources” isn’t a good excuse. Leaders can find time and resources for the things that truly matter if they TRULY MATTER. Your willingness to work for it, advocate for it, and believe in it. If there has ever been a time to buy into “trickle down,” it is for this kind of work.

If you’re looking for  information on how kickstart your career, browse our current job openings! We help entry-level job seekers find positions that fit their expertise and career goals every day.

Benefits Basics

Insights

5 Ways to Support Black Employees

VP of DEI, Teron Buford shares five ways companies can support their Black employees.

Nicole Peterlin

Director of Human Resources

How can company’s support their employees directly and acknowledge issues they face?

First, and foremost, you must be bold. Often, companies feel the obligation to explain why they’re spending time, energy, efforts, and resources supporting a specific group (in this case, Black employees) to employees who are not members that group (in this case, White employees). It’s taxing and further alienates when the primary goal is to bolster feelings of belonging. Now, I’m not saying that companies shouldn’t provide background information on why initiatives exist; instead, I’m saying that companies should provide the background and move into the implementation stages ASAP. Don’t spend time worrying about which privileged/highly represented group members might have FOMO; spend that energy doing the work.

Get away from the idea that equality is the gold standard. It’s not. Equality suggests that giving everyone the same resources or treating everyone the same way is the fix-all for DEI issues within a company. That’s analogous to giving everyone a slice of pepperoni pizza and disregarding the fact that some folks can’t eat cheese, gluten, pork, and/or tomatoes. Be bold in listening to the needs of under-represented employee groups and then act on their feedback. That’s when we step away from the idea of equality and toward the aspiration of equity: meeting employees where they are and giving the access to resources to get them to where they want to be.

How should company’s reach out to their Black employees?

There’s no one-size-fits-all playbook for reaching out to black employees. The size of the company, number of Black employees, and already-established culture of the company are just a few things to consider when determining the best way to solicit input. Small company? Maybe safely assembling a group of Black employees to talk about their shared interests/concerns and potential solutions/desired outcomes is the way to go. Large company? Perhaps a climate survey to gauge perceptions and possible action steps. Knowing the audience and the company culture will be step one in devising an approach. Here’s the dirty little secret: it’s going to take time, trust-building, and intentionality to gain buy-in; that’s the hard part. But hard doesn’t mean “impossible.” We prioritize the things that we feel are important. If gaining perspective from your Black employees is valued, you’ll make time for it.

How should companies go about training for these topics?

Authentic voices are key. I want someone who looks and lives like me talking about experiences that are unique to people who look and live like me. That’s #1.

Modality is totally based on the audience. Some folks prefer reading and reflecting. Some prefer watching and taking notes. Others prefer listening and discussing. A healthy mix is probably the best way to go but, as always, the onus is with the facilitator(s) to know the group, understand their needs, and provide a curriculum that fits the learning style of the group. Remember: equity is better than equality in these cases.

It’s also important to note that modality should be fluid. What works today may not be applicable tomorrow. Instead of growing frustrated with changing landscapes, companies should work to become more flexible and open to the ever-evolving nature that is the human experience, which is exponentially more complicated at its intersection with race and ethnicity.

How can companies build a better workplace for Black employees?

Companies can’t be afraid to boldly go where others haven’t gone before. There will always be detractors and people who will ask “why do they get….but we don’t…..?” The company must determine which side of the fence they want to operate on and then do so boldly. Might you lose clients? Sure. Might you gain clients? Sure. It’s on the company to decide who and how it wants to serve. Part of that means listening to the needs of their under-represented employees (in this case, black employees) and then having the gumption to do something with the information that’s collected.

Also, building a diverse workforce is important but should not be the final goal. Companies need to ask themselves “what are we doing to empower the voices within our walls? Do we have meaningfully diverse and inclusive representation in positions of leadership? Do those in positions of leadership have power to create meaningful change?” You get the drift. It’s not a numbers game; it’s a matter of creating a sense of belonging and buy-in.

Also, if companies want to see more Black employees gravitate toward their business (for employment or use of services), companies should consider how they’re showing up to and for the Black community. Are you supporting policies and practices that benefit these communities? Are you speaking out against injustice? Are you using your platform to promote meaningful change? Are you modeling the environment you encourage other companies to have? Are you reinvesting in the community? Answering these (and other) questions will help you better understand how/why your company is/is not having success with recruiting, hiring, retaining Black talent and might provide insight on how the community views your presence.

How can leaders promote conversations around race?

They shouldn’t only “promote” the conversations; they should MODEL them. Be the example. Show that it’s ok to not know EVERYTHING. It’s ok to make mistakes, it’s ok to not fully grasp the lived-experiences and perceptions of other races. And, in the same vein, be willing to learn, share, own missteps, and take an active role in their own growth.

Leaders need to be better at acting on intel. If my son brings an important issue to me, it’s up to me to decide how to act on it. My response (or lack thereof) will directly impact his willingness to bring other concerns to me. His trust is me may falter. And his belief in my allyship may waiver. My son’s experience with me will undoubtedly be shared with my daughter who, too, may become wary of my desire to help. And, before I know it, the kids will be ready to label me as someone who is too rigid to change and too stubborn to admit shortcomings. Leaders need to allow themselves to believe the perspectives of others and then meaningfully work to support.

Leaders need to make working toward DEI+B (belonging) a priority. Not having “enough time” isn’t a good excuse. Not having “enough resources” isn’t a good excuse. Leaders can find time and resources for the things that truly matter if they TRULY MATTER. Your willingness to work for it, advocate for it, and believe in it. If there has ever been a time to buy into “trickle down,” it is for this kind of work.

If you’re looking for  information on how kickstart your career, browse our current job openings! We help entry-level job seekers find positions that fit their expertise and career goals every day.

Avenicast | Episode 8: Spotlight on Olivia Brandt of Willis Towers Watson

Insights

Avenicast | Episode 8: Spotlight on Olivia Brandt of Willis Towers Watson

Avenica

On this episode of Avenicast, Olivia Brandt and Scott Dettman discuss how they translated their collegiate athletic experiences into the workplace. They also explore the value of making time for relationships and being willing to learn from failures.

“Follow your interests. If you’re passionate it will resonate.” – Olivia Brandt

Olivia Brandt didn’t plan to go into the pharmaceutical industry. After hearing her friend mention it, she figured why not try? Throughout college she was set on taking the classes she found interesting, which led her all the way through pharmaceutical school.

Her first job was with Target, as a manager in the store’s pharmaceutical department. She shares the huge learning curve she faced in creating relationships within the busy nature of retail and how she wishes she would have had a mentor during the time just after college graduation.

As former collegiate athletes, Olivia and Scott compare notes and dive into how to best use those skills learned in the professional setting. This episode even touches on the lessons Olivia and Scott have learned from popular sports shows like The Last Dance and Ted Lasso.

By continuing to build on her experiences, Olivia is now a pharmaceutical consultant at Willis Towers Watson Health and Benefits. She is impacting lives on a large scale. When signing up for benefits it’s likely your company will have someone like Olivia helping to make your decisions.

Listen now to hear all the details of Olivia’s post college career path!

   

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Avenicast | Episode 7: Spotlight on Julie McCallum of Inspire Medical Systems

Insights

Avenicast | Episode 8: Spotlight on Olivia Brandt of Willis Towers Watson

Avenica

On this episode of Avenicast, Olivia Brandt and Scott Dettman discuss how they translated their collegiate athletic experiences into the workplace. They also explore the value of making time for relationships and being willing to learn from failures.

“Follow your interests. If you’re passionate it will resonate.” – Olivia Brandt

Olivia Brandt didn’t plan to go into the pharmaceutical industry. After hearing her friend mention it, she figured why not try? Throughout college she was set on taking the classes she found interesting, which led her all the way through pharmaceutical school.

Her first job was with Target, as a manager in the store’s pharmaceutical department. She shares the huge learning curve she faced in creating relationships within the busy nature of retail and how she wishes she would have had a mentor during the time just after college graduation.

As former collegiate athletes, Olivia and Scott compare notes and dive into how to best use those skills learned in the professional setting. This episode even touches on the lessons Olivia and Scott have learned from popular sports shows like The Last Dance and Ted Lasso.

By continuing to build on her experiences, Olivia is now a pharmaceutical consultant at Willis Towers Watson Health and Benefits. She is impacting lives on a large scale. When signing up for benefits it’s likely your company will have someone like Olivia helping to make your decisions.

Listen now to hear all the details of Olivia’s post college career path!

   

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

What Can I Do With My Liberal Arts Degree?

Insights

Avenicast | Episode 8: Spotlight on Olivia Brandt of Willis Towers Watson

Avenica

On this episode of Avenicast, Olivia Brandt and Scott Dettman discuss how they translated their collegiate athletic experiences into the workplace. They also explore the value of making time for relationships and being willing to learn from failures.

“Follow your interests. If you’re passionate it will resonate.” – Olivia Brandt

Olivia Brandt didn’t plan to go into the pharmaceutical industry. After hearing her friend mention it, she figured why not try? Throughout college she was set on taking the classes she found interesting, which led her all the way through pharmaceutical school.

Her first job was with Target, as a manager in the store’s pharmaceutical department. She shares the huge learning curve she faced in creating relationships within the busy nature of retail and how she wishes she would have had a mentor during the time just after college graduation.

As former collegiate athletes, Olivia and Scott compare notes and dive into how to best use those skills learned in the professional setting. This episode even touches on the lessons Olivia and Scott have learned from popular sports shows like The Last Dance and Ted Lasso.

By continuing to build on her experiences, Olivia is now a pharmaceutical consultant at Willis Towers Watson Health and Benefits. She is impacting lives on a large scale. When signing up for benefits it’s likely your company will have someone like Olivia helping to make your decisions.

Listen now to hear all the details of Olivia’s post college career path!

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

Scott Dettman Featured on BBC Worklife

Insights

Avenicast | Episode 8: Spotlight on Olivia Brandt of Willis Towers Watson

Avenica

On this episode of Avenicast, Olivia Brandt and Scott Dettman discuss how they translated their collegiate athletic experiences into the workplace. They also explore the value of making time for relationships and being willing to learn from failures.

“Follow your interests. If you’re passionate it will resonate.” – Olivia Brandt

Olivia Brandt didn’t plan to go into the pharmaceutical industry. After hearing her friend mention it, she figured why not try? Throughout college she was set on taking the classes she found interesting, which led her all the way through pharmaceutical school.

Her first job was with Target, as a manager in the store’s pharmaceutical department. She shares the huge learning curve she faced in creating relationships within the busy nature of retail and how she wishes she would have had a mentor during the time just after college graduation.

As former collegiate athletes, Olivia and Scott compare notes and dive into how to best use those skills learned in the professional setting. This episode even touches on the lessons Olivia and Scott have learned from popular sports shows like The Last Dance and Ted Lasso.

By continuing to build on her experiences, Olivia is now a pharmaceutical consultant at Willis Towers Watson Health and Benefits. She is impacting lives on a large scale. When signing up for benefits it’s likely your company will have someone like Olivia helping to make your decisions.

Listen now to hear all the details of Olivia’s post college career path!

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

DEI Hiring Practices

Insights

Avenicast | Episode 8: Spotlight on Olivia Brandt of Willis Towers Watson

Avenica

On this episode of Avenicast, Olivia Brandt and Scott Dettman discuss how they translated their collegiate athletic experiences into the workplace. They also explore the value of making time for relationships and being willing to learn from failures.

“Follow your interests. If you’re passionate it will resonate.” – Olivia Brandt

Olivia Brandt didn’t plan to go into the pharmaceutical industry. After hearing her friend mention it, she figured why not try? Throughout college she was set on taking the classes she found interesting, which led her all the way through pharmaceutical school.

Her first job was with Target, as a manager in the store’s pharmaceutical department. She shares the huge learning curve she faced in creating relationships within the busy nature of retail and how she wishes she would have had a mentor during the time just after college graduation.

As former collegiate athletes, Olivia and Scott compare notes and dive into how to best use those skills learned in the professional setting. This episode even touches on the lessons Olivia and Scott have learned from popular sports shows like The Last Dance and Ted Lasso.

By continuing to build on her experiences, Olivia is now a pharmaceutical consultant at Willis Towers Watson Health and Benefits. She is impacting lives on a large scale. When signing up for benefits it’s likely your company will have someone like Olivia helping to make your decisions.

Listen now to hear all the details of Olivia’s post college career path!

The Ultimate Workplace Dress Code Guide

Insights

Avenicast | Episode 8: Spotlight on Olivia Brandt of Willis Towers Watson

Avenica

On this episode of Avenicast, Olivia Brandt and Scott Dettman discuss how they translated their collegiate athletic experiences into the workplace. They also explore the value of making time for relationships and being willing to learn from failures.

“Follow your interests. If you’re passionate it will resonate.” – Olivia Brandt

Olivia Brandt didn’t plan to go into the pharmaceutical industry. After hearing her friend mention it, she figured why not try? Throughout college she was set on taking the classes she found interesting, which led her all the way through pharmaceutical school.

Her first job was with Target, as a manager in the store’s pharmaceutical department. She shares the huge learning curve she faced in creating relationships within the busy nature of retail and how she wishes she would have had a mentor during the time just after college graduation.

As former collegiate athletes, Olivia and Scott compare notes and dive into how to best use those skills learned in the professional setting. This episode even touches on the lessons Olivia and Scott have learned from popular sports shows like The Last Dance and Ted Lasso.

By continuing to build on her experiences, Olivia is now a pharmaceutical consultant at Willis Towers Watson Health and Benefits. She is impacting lives on a large scale. When signing up for benefits it’s likely your company will have someone like Olivia helping to make your decisions.

Listen now to hear all the details of Olivia’s post college career path!

Smart Casual

Smart Casual in a nutshell means casual with touches of business wear. It is one step more casual than Business Casual and one step more formal than Casual. Offices that look for Smart Casual as a standard are often looking for:

  • Dark denim, free of holes or rips + a blazer or blouse on top
  • Chinos, a skirt or dressier pants + a solid colored tee and accessories
  • Closed-toed shoes

Business Casual

Business Casual is a bit more tailored than Smart Casual and typically does not allow for denim. With this style attire, ties and blazers are not included. Think: dress pants, skirts and button-down tops and blazers without the formal elements.

Elements of Business Casual dress often include:

  • Dress pants/skirts/dresses
  • Blouse/button-up shirts/sweater
  • Closed-toed shoes

Business Professional

When you think Business Professional, the easiest way to imagine it would be straight out of a Mad Men episode… but 2021. Business Professional attire is commonly required in the banking, government and legal industries but not limited to them. It is the most formal of the three most-common dress-codes.

  • Business Professional attire includes:
  • Suit (jacket and pants/skirt)
  • Solid colored button-up top
  • Closed-toed shoes

As you can see, each dress-code has its own formula. The only constant among all of these? Closed-toed shoes. This is often not just a preference but a health and safety standard for many companies. When in doubt, ask your boss for their definition of the dress-code and ask for an example.

Working from home? That’s a whole other story but the basics remain true. Be sure what you wear meets your company’s policies and/or dress-code for what you can see on screen if utilizing video conferencing. From the waist down we are fans of sweatpants and fuzzy slippers.

Don’t forget to always iron or steam your clothes to make the ultimate impression. Happy outfit planning!

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.

What LGBTQIA+ Inclusion Means

Insights

Avenicast | Episode 8: Spotlight on Olivia Brandt of Willis Towers Watson

Teron Buford

On this episode of Avenicast, Olivia Brandt and Scott Dettman discuss how they translated their collegiate athletic experiences into the workplace. They also explore the value of making time for relationships and being willing to learn from failures.

“Follow your interests. If you’re passionate it will resonate.” – Olivia Brandt

Olivia Brandt didn’t plan to go into the pharmaceutical industry. After hearing her friend mention it, she figured why not try? Throughout college she was set on taking the classes she found interesting, which led her all the way through pharmaceutical school.

Her first job was with Target, as a manager in the store’s pharmaceutical department. She shares the huge learning curve she faced in creating relationships within the busy nature of retail and how she wishes she would have had a mentor during the time just after college graduation.

As former collegiate athletes, Olivia and Scott compare notes and dive into how to best use those skills learned in the professional setting. This episode even touches on the lessons Olivia and Scott have learned from popular sports shows like The Last Dance and Ted Lasso.

By continuing to build on her experiences, Olivia is now a pharmaceutical consultant at Willis Towers Watson Health and Benefits. She is impacting lives on a large scale. When signing up for benefits it’s likely your company will have someone like Olivia helping to make your decisions.

Listen now to hear all the details of Olivia’s post college career path!

About Avenica

Through conversation, high-impact coaching, and best-in-class support, we translate and meet the needs of our client partners by identifying and transforming potential into high-performing professionals. At Avenica, we are working from the inside out to embrace diverse thought and perspectives while actively working to dismantle systems of oppression and implicit bias. With a deeply-held belief in human potential, we transform lives and enable organizations to achieve new heights.

If you’re interested in partnering with us to develop or hire your workforce, let’s talk. If you’re a job seeker, please join our network to connect with an Avenica Account Manager.